November 2016 – Where to look for the planets

A few pointers:

  • All planets visible to the unaided eye look like stars. Planets visible to the unaided eye include Mercury, Venus, Earth (look down!), Mars, Jupiter and Saturn.
  • In a telescope, Uranus and Neptune are visible as tiny discs. The dwarf planet Pluto remains looking like a star in even the largest amateur telescope.
  • Stars are shown to magnitude 5 on the charts unless otherwise noted. This is a compromise between what you would see from the light polluted skies of a city (where you will see significantly less stars) and dark country skies (where you will see significantly more stars).
  • Unless otherwise noted, the finder charts are prepared for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory. The charts will be useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia.
  • Times are listed in Australian Eastern Standard Time and Australian Eastern Daylight Savings time when in force. As a guide, in Canberra, Australian Capital Territory in 2016, Daylight Savings Time ends on Sunday 3 April and begins on Sunday 2 October 2016.

8 November 2016 – Venus – Late afternoon daytime sky

Venus. A daytime view prepared for 6:30 pm AEST / 7: 30 pm AEDT on Tuesday 8 November 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). A high powered telescope will be required to see Venus as seen in this chart. Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

Venus. A daytime view prepared for 6:30 pm AEST / 7: 30 pm AEDT on Tuesday 8 November 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). A high powered telescope will be required to see Venus as seen in this chart. Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

8 November 2016 – Moon without labels – Late afternoon daytime sky

Moon without labels. A daytime view prepared for 6:30 pm AEST / 7: 30 pm AEDT on Tuesday 8 November 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). A high powered telescope will be required to see Venus as seen in this chart. Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

Moon without labels. A daytime view prepared for 6:30 pm AEST / 7: 30 pm AEDT on Tuesday 8 November 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). The blue daytime sky has been turned off to improve contrast on the chart.  Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

8 November 2016 – Moon with labels – Late afternoon daytime sky

Moon with labels. A daytime view prepared for 6:30 pm AEST / 7: 30 pm AEDT on Tuesday 8 November 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). A high powered telescope will be required to see Venus as seen in this chart. Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

Moon with labels. A daytime view prepared for 6:30 pm AEST / 7: 30 pm AEDT on Tuesday 8 November 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). The blue daytime sky has been turned off to improve contrast on the chart. Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

8 November 2016 – Southern Cross, ‘The Pointers’ (Alpha and Beta Centarui), Scorpius, Venus and Saturn finder chart – Evening sky

Southern Cross, 'The Pointers' (Alpha and Beta Centarui), Scorpius, Venus and Saturn finder chart. The reddish unlabelled star in Scorpius is Antares. Chart prepared for 8 pm AEST / 9 pm AEDT on Tuesday 8 November 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

Southern Cross, ‘The Pointers’ (Alpha and Beta Centarui), Scorpius, Venus and Saturn finder chart. The reddish unlabelled star in Scorpius is Antares. Chart prepared for 8 pm AEST / 9 pm AEDT on Tuesday 8 November 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

8 November 2016 – Moon, Venus, Mars, Saturn, Scorpius and Sagittarius finder chart – Evening sky

Moon, Venus, Mars, Saturn, Scorpius and Sagittarius finder chart. The reddish unlabelled star in Scorpius is Antares. Chart prepared for 8 pm AEST / 9 pm AEDT on Tuesday 8 November 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

Moon, Venus, Mars, Saturn, Scorpius and Sagittarius finder chart. The reddish unlabelled star in Scorpius is Antares. Chart prepared for 8 pm AEST / 9 pm AEDT on Tuesday 8 November 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

8 November 2016 – Uranus and Pegasus finder chart finder chart – Evening sky

Uranus and Pegasus finder chart. Uranus is not visible to the unaided eye. To locate this magnitude +5.7 object, you will need either large binoculars or a telescope, a decent star chart and patience. Chart prepared for 8 pm AEST / 9 pm AEDT on Tuesday 8 November 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

Uranus and Pegasus finder chart. Uranus is not visible to the unaided eye. To locate this magnitude +5.7 object, you will need either large binoculars or a telescope, a decent star chart and patience. Chart prepared for 8 pm AEST / 9 pm AEDT on Tuesday 8 November 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

14 November 2016 – 2016 Super Moon Finder Chart – Late evening sky

2016 'Super Moon' finder chart. Chart prepared for 11:52 pm AEST Monday 14 November 2016 / 12:52 am AEDT Tuesday 15 November 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). November 2016's Full Moon occurs just two hours after the Moon's closest approach to the Earth for 2016. At perigee (closest approach to the Earth) the Moon will be 356,509 km and the moment Full Moon occurs, the Moon will be 356,520 km from Earth. Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

2016 ‘Super Moon’ finder chart. Chart prepared for 11:52 pm AEST Monday 14 November 2016 / 12:52 am AEDT Tuesday 15 November 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). November 2016’s Full Moon occurs just two hours after the Moon’s closest approach to the Earth for 2016. At perigee (closest approach to the Earth) the Moon will be 356,509 km and the moment Full Moon occurs, the Moon will be 356,520 km from Earth. Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

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