July 2016 – Where to look for the planets

A few pointers:

  • All planets visible to the unaided eye look like stars. Planets visible to the unaided eye include Mercury, Venus, Earth (look down!), Mars, Jupiter and Saturn.
  • In a telescope, Uranus and Neptune are visible as tiny discs. The minor planet Pluto remains looking like a star in even the largest amateur telescope.
  • Stars are shown to magnitude 5 on the charts unless otherwise noted. This is a compromise between what you would see from the light polluted skies of a city (where you will see significantly less stars) and dark country skies (where you will see significantly more stars).
  • Unless otherwise noted, the finder charts are provided for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory. The charts will be useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia.
  • Times are listed in Australian Eastern Standard Time and Australian Eastern Daylight Savings time when in force. As a guide, in Canberra, Australian Capital Territory in 2016, Daylight Savings Time ends on Sunday 3 April and begins on Sunday 2 October 2016.

4 July 2016 (U.S. Pacific Time) – NASA Juno probe arrives at Jupiter

Artist concept of Juno probe arriving at Jupiter in July 2016. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Artist concept of Juno probe arriving at Jupiter in July 2016.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA’s Juno mission will arrive at Jupiter on 4 July 2016 (U.S. Pacific Time). Assuming the probe successfully goes into orbit around Jupiter, we will be treated to some spectacular images of Jupiter and its moons before radiation destroys the camera (expected around orbit 8).

9 July 2016 – Moon and Jupiter finder chart – Afternoon day sky

Moon and Jupiter chart. Binoculars will be needed to locate Jupiter. Prepared for 2 pm AEST on Saturday 9 July 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

Moon and Jupiter chart. Binoculars will be needed to locate Jupiter. Prepared for 2 pm AEST on Saturday 9 July 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

9 July 2016 – Moon and Jupiter finder chart – Early evening sky

Moon and Jupiter chart. Prepared for 6:30 pm AEST on Saturday 9 July 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

Moon and Jupiter chart. Prepared for 6:30 pm AEST on Saturday 9 July 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

9 July 2016 – Jupiter and Galilean Moons finder chart – Early evening sky

Jupiter and Galilean Moons finder chart. Prepared for 6:30 pm AEST on Saturday 9 July 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Note that Ganymede is transiting (crossing in front of) Jupiter. I have never been able to see an event like this with my small telescope. Hopefully you will have better luck using your telescope. Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

Jupiter and Galilean Moons finder chart. Prepared for 6:30 pm AEST on Saturday 9 July 2016 for Canberra, Australian Capital Territory (but will be also useful for elsewhere in Eastern Australia). Note that Ganymede is transiting (crossing in front of) Jupiter. I have never been able to see an event like this with my small telescope. Hopefully you will have better luck using your telescope. Chart created using the highly recommended Sky Safari Pro tablet app. Used with permission.

.

.

Comments are closed.